Bell Harbor

Welcome to the 2015 IGDA Leadership Summit!

The International Game Developers Association (IGDA) is pleased to announce the launch the IGDA Leadership Summit, a 2-day event highlighting strategies and skill sets required for exhibiting leadership in today’s dynamic game industry. From executives and producers to artists, writers and programmers, the goal of this event is to help the community become better leaders, create successful games, and learn from other working professionals as well as exhibit leadership in our industry. This year the IGDA Leadership Summit will also highlight the theme of industry diversity.

 

Background

The International Game Developers Association (IGDA), is the largest non-profit membership organization in the world serving all individuals who create games. The IGDA exists to advance the careers and enhance the lives of game developers by connecting members with their peers, promoting professional development, and advocating on issues that affect the developer community.

Following on its mission, the IGDA conducted its successful Leadership Forums from 2007 to 2011, focused on advancing the state of the art in game production and management. The conferences were invaluable for game developers in leadership positions as well as for individuals who sought to improve their leadership skills. While “leadership” is most often associated with management, our goal is to empower game industry professionals to exhibit leadership in all its forms, regardless of their role in the process of game creation.

 

Key Program Highlights

Tuesday, 1 September (evening)

  • IGDA Seattle Job Recruiting Fair and Mixer
  • Speaker & VIP Networking Event

Wednesday, 2 September

  • Keynotes by leading figures in the global media industries (to be announced soon!)
  • Tracks focused leadership in Business and in Production roles
  • Evening Networking Mixer
  • IGDA Foundation Charity Dinner

Thursday, 3 September

  • Hands-on, practical workshops on applying leadership principles and diversity practices